The Expats

Book Jacket  4W, 4H  Audio

Pavone, Chris., (c. 2012).  The Expats.  Read by Mozhan Marno.  Books on Tape. 10 discs (12 hrs, 24 mins), $32.95.

ISBN: 9780307990310

Reviews

NY Times, Kirkus Reviews

Annotation:

Ex CIA agent Kate Moore becomes the picture perfect ex-pat in Luxembourg until a new couple activates her well-honed instincts and she knows their survival is at risk.

Summary:  

Kate Moore is a typical expat mom with two kids supporting her husband in his new job in Luxembourg.  She left her job, her life in Washington D.C. knowing that it was a good move for her family, hoping that her past would finally be behind her.  But she can’t ignore her CIA training when questionable behavior starts coming to her notice.  Who is this couple that has suddenly popped into their lives and what exactly does her husband do and why has he become so evasive?  Soon Kate is traveling around the European continent hoping to find answers through her CIA contacts.  Is she over reacting or is she protecting her family?  This taught tale of intrigue will keep you on the edge of your seat, uncertain as to anyone’s intentions.

Evaluation:

Although the audio book was entertaining, this type of story in audio format can get confusing with all the characters coming in and out of the scenes along with the clandestine behavior that may be easier to follow in print.  Regardless, Pavone has created a wonderful heroine who is more chameleon than mom when it comes down to survival.  The plot is full of twists and turns reminding me of vintage Robert Ludlum.  Taking the reader on a tour of modern Europe, this is a great read for anyone who loves international intrigue along with a heroine who does not just sit by and let the world determine her place in it.  She is definitely a take-action kind of girl.

Author’s Website:

Chris Pavone

Genre/Subgenre:

Fiction/International espionage

Awards:

New York Times Bestseller

Edgar Award Winner

Anthony Award Winner

Readalikes:

The Girl Who Kicked the Hornets Nest by Steig Larsson.

The Lost Symbol by Dan Brown.

Book Discussion Questions:

1.  Kate’s character is constantly evolving.  Which role seems to fit her best or does she successfully incorporate them all?

2. Kate had led a double life and now is faced with the fact that her husband might be too. Is she setting a double standard or just responding to her well-honed skills?

3. Dexter sites human gullibility as a weakness yet he becomes ultimately gullible.  What makes him gullible?  Is he ultimately blameless?

4. What does this novel say about trust?  What does this novel say about marriage?

Reasons for selection:

I wanted to read something with international intrigue so I found this while on NoveList as a read-a-like for Steig Larsson’s “Dragon Series” and thought I would give it a try.  I’m glad I did.  Pavone definitely packs a punch and has the talent to intertwine multiple plots and characters for a very satisfying read.

Odd Thomas

Book Jacket  3W, 3H

Koontz, Dean., (c. 2003).  Odd Thomas.  Bantam Books. 512 pages , $23.95.

ISBN: 9780553802498

Reviews:

The Guardian, The Examiner

Annotation:

Odd Thomas has a secret.  He can see ghosts. This is interesting but would be more so if he knew why.  Until the borachs arrive bringing evil to town.

Summary:  

Odd Thomas is a 20 year old cook who likes staying under the radar in the sleepy California town.  Only the Sheriff is aware of his sixth sense and he wants to keep it that way.  Well, his girlfriend Stormy knows the truth but she’s special so that’s OK.  Odd, which is his real name, can see ghosts, at least those that have unfinished business that needs to get cleared up before they can move to the final destination.  Odd has gotten used to having these surprise visitors but since they can’t talk, he has to figure out what they need and what they expect him to do about it.  Along with this “gift” is the other kind of ghost with which he has to deal, the borachs.  These apparitions swarm around people who are evil.  Of course, they don’t communicate either and Odd knows better than to try but since he’s the only one who even knows they are around, it’s up to him to not just figure out their purpose but to stop the evil before it destroys the town he loves.

Evaluation:

Odd is well, odd.  And that’s just part of his charm.  He is that low-key crime fighter who stumbles into mayhem and must beat the bad guy before the bad guy succeeds in causing mass destruction.  Koontz has created a wonderfully normal character who’s talent puts him in a unique position to thwart the bad guy while needing to remain low-key.  In a world where we are bombarded by people seeking the spotlight for every little accomplishment, this is a refreshing look at one young man’s commitment to keep his town and loved ones as safe as he possible can.  Although a slow start, the story is one that sucks you in and compels you to keep going.  I was a little skeptical at first glance but when finished, I immediately sought out the second in series.

Author’s Website:

Dean Koontz

Genre/Subgenre:

Horror

Readalikes:

Ash by James Herbert.

Deadtown by Nancy Holzer

Book Discussion Questions:

1. Talk about the name “Odd”.  Is it fitting?  Does it define the character?

2. Why did Odd write the book and what were his intentions of doing so?

3.  Why did Odd worry about people finding out about him but was able to share his “talent” with the town sheriff?

4. Why is Stormy’s character a good match for Odd?

Reasons for selection:

I had not picked up a Koontz novel for quite some time and was eager to happily fall into one of his weirdly realistic worlds.  One of my co-workers suggested the Odd Thomas series (I always perk up at the mention of a series) so I thought I’d try it.  Odd Thomas is truly odd but in true Koontz-style, believable in that weird other-worldly way.  I would recommend this book to anyone able to set aside reality and jump into a world that is so like ours but so not.  Similar to Stephen King, it will keep you looking over your shoulder for that elusive borach.

Blue Heaven

Book Jacket  4W, 4H

Box, C.J., (c. 2008).  Blue Heaven.  St. Martins Minotaur. 352 pages , $23.95.

ISBN: 9780312365707

Reviews

Kirkus Reviews, Publishers Weekly

Annotation:

When two children witness a murder in the Northern Idaho, they run for their lives.  But are they safe from the ex-cops they saw commit the crime?

Summary:  

An execution-style murder is witnessed by a twelve year old girl and her younger brother in the backwoods near their home in Northern Idaho.  As if that isn’t bad enough, the four men involved see them.  Running for their lives, the children soon realize that they can’t trust anyone except an old-rancher whose barn they seek out for refuge.

This part of Idaho has been dubbed “Blue Heaven” by the Los Angeles cops who have taken up retirement there.  And it’s the ex-cops that are in pursuit of the children.  But more is going on that brings attention to this part of the country.  Suspicious $100 bills are surfacing that were part of a robbery from a southern California race track years back.  Retired Detective, Villatoro is determined to solve this open case  and follow whatever leads he can find.  As all the pieces start coming together, the rancher Jess Rawlins and Detective Villatoro must face down these highly skilled and highly motivated ex-cops before they kill the children.

Evaluation:

Box skillfully brings together the plot lines and characters to produce his usual back-country brand of justice.  And even without his main series character, Joe Pickett, this stand-alone effectively puts the reader in the middle of beautiful country where human weaknesses have met their match. Box manages to introduce all the characters but gradually expose the threads tying everyone together making the climax not so much surprising but more validated.  In the spirit of the old-western, good versus evil is clearly laid out but with the twists and turns of modern day crime, weapons and greed.   Even if you are a Joe Pickett fan, Blue Heaven still provides all the reasons you love to read C.J. Box but with a whole set of new characters that will grab your heart and scream for justice, the old-west way.

Author’s Website:

C.J. Box

Genre/Subgenre:

Mystery/Crime

Awards:

  • Edgar Allan Poe Awards: Best Novel
  • The Reading List (RUSA): 2009

Readalikes:

Started Early, Took My Dog by Kate Atkinson.

The Narrows by Michael Connelly

Book Discussion Questions:

1. Describe Kootenai Bay and how does the nickname “Blue Heaven” fit?

2.  What traits does Annie display early on that makes her “a survivor”?

3.  Are Monica’s actions believable or is her character conveniently manipulated for the purpose of the plot?

4. Is Rawlins a throw-back to the Old-West hero?  What makes him the “unlikely hero”?

Reasons for selection:

I am an avid C.J. Box fan.  His Joe Pickett series always sends me back to my summers in Montana, without the murder and mayhem of course.  He was recommended to me by a library patron in 2009 and I haven’t stopped reading him.  I picked up Blue Heaven because it’s one of Box’s stand alone titles that still takes place in the rugged mountains of the north west.

The Age of Miracles

  4W, 4H

Walker, Karen Thompson, (c. 2012). The Age of Miracles.  Random House.  288 pages , $24.99.

ISBN:  9780812992977

Reviews:

New York Times,  The Washington Post

Annotation:

As the earth’s rotation slows, nothing is as it used to be.   Julia is turning 12, coping with a new world and her new self.

Summary:  

Julia lives in San Diego, California and is on the brink of becoming a teenager when something out of the ordinary starts taking place.  The earth’s rotation has started to slow down significantly.  The scientists are at a loss as to its cause and can not predict if or when the slowing will stop.  So like everyone else, they watch their days and nights get longer affecting every aspect of the human.  But Julia’s world continues to be that of an average pre-teen where she is surrounded by uncertainty with friends, family, popularity and boys.  Her environment which is changing around her just adds to the weirdness of it all.

This beautifully written coming-of-age story will capture your imagination and leave you wondering about an existence with bright nights and dark days and living life with the overriding knowledge that the future is not a guarantee.

Evaluation:

Walker defines the pre-teen part of our lives as “The Age of Miracles” and her story is a celebration of the human instinct to focus on self at this time of change even in a world that is slowly coming to an end.  The story will capture your interest from the first page and keep you hooked the entire time.  A beautifully written tale of relationships, uncertainty and inevitability as the characters cope with an ever-changing landscape while trying to keep their lives as normal as possible.

Genre/Subgenre:

Mainstream Fiction/Science Fiction

Awards:

Booklist Editor’s Choice: Adult Fiction for Young Adults 2012

School Library Journal’s Adult Books 4 Teens 2012

Readalikes:

The Last Policeman by Ben H. Winters.   Safekeeping by Karen Hesse.

Book Discussion Questions:

Why are “real-timers” seen as a threat?

What makes this story and premise believable/not-believable to you?

What is the rest of Seth’s story?

Reasons for selection:

This is a selection for our class book discussion groups.  I found the novel to be very thought provoking and believable as to what would take place if our world did start slowing down.