Cold Hearted

Book Jacket  3W, 3H – Audio

Barton, Beverly, (c. 2008). Cold Hearted.  Read by Lisa York.  Phoenix Audio. 10 discs (11 hrs, 30 mins) , $35.95.

ISBN:  978-1-5977-7212-9

Reviews

Publisher’s Weekly, The Book Bag

Annotation:

Everyone loves Jordan Price.  Including Rick, the investigator hired to find her husband’s killer.  But while he’s protecting Jordan, could he be her next victim?

Summary:  

When Rick is hired to investigate the State Senator’s death, he is drawn to his widow, Jordan Price, who does not seem as affected by the death as he would have thought.  As a matter of fact, upon further investigation, several men in her life have unexpectedly met their end by accident or suicide.  A coincidence?  Rick isn’t willing to bet on it.  But as he gets to know Jordan better, it is harder to see her as a Black Widow, especially as he starts falling in love with her.  Is loving Jordan worth the risk?  Could Rick be the next victim?

Evaluation:

I listened to this selection and looked forward to every time I had to jump in my car.  I’m the reader that was guessing all the way to the end.  I realized I was gracefully led into every theory Barton laid out  only to be thwarted about the same time Rick figured it out.  I would definitely recommend this to anyone who loves some romance with their mystery.  Lisa York, the reader, deftly handled both male and female characters using her southern accent aptly to distinguish between the players.  I could easily follow who was talking.  No fault of York’s and probably part of the appeal of the suspense tactic, it usually took me a few lines to figure out when the story switched to the viewpoint of the killer.  But I think that was intended since there were so many suspects.

Genre/Subgenre:

Romance/Suspense

Readalikes:

Dark of Night by Suzanne Brockman.

Deadline by Sandra Brown

Book Discussion Questions:

1.  Do you like Jordan Price?  Has she created the world around her and if so, how?

2.  If this were made into a movie, who would you cast for the main characters?

3.  Of all Jordan’s family members, which one has the most redeeming qualities?

4.  When did you figure out who the killer is?  What gave them away?

Reasons for selection:

I used to read romance all the time and now I’m more into a mystery mode.  Romantic Suspense is the perfect combination for a fun read.  I had read Barton a few years back and remember the plot and characters being thoroughly entertaining.  This selection did not disappoint.  I look forward to listening to more from this author.

Emma

4W, 1H – Audio

Austin, Jane, (c. 2007). Emma.  Read by Anghard Rees and a full cast.  BBC Radio. 5 discs (5 hrs, 15 mins) , $35.95.

ISBN:  978-1-6028-3281-7

Reviews

Publisher’s Weekly, The Book Bag

Annotation:

Bright, young and with no intention of marrying, Emma Watson happily inserts herself in other people’s lives, believing her skills as a matchmaker are needed.

Summary:  

Beautiful, clever, rich and single, Emma Watson has no interested in love or marriage but she delights in playing matchmaker whenever possible.  Her sights are set on her new companion, Harriet Smith who Emma views as the perfect match for the vicar, Mr.Elton.  Unfortunately, Mr. Elton has his eye on Emma and could not bring himself to fall for someone as lowly as Ms. Smith.  The only person who seems to understand Emma even better than she understands herself is their family friend Mr. Knightly who continuously warns Emma to mind her own affairs.

With the appearance of Jane Fairfax and Frank Churchill who are secretly engaged, the whirlwind of matchmaking blunders continues until even Emma seems satisfied with the outcome.

Evaluation:

Warning – if at all possible, pick another audio book version of Emma.  I am only taking the time to write this up so as to deter those from thinking it might be a good choice.  I listen to many books on CD and yes, the reader matters.  It was suggested to me that I experience an audio book with a full cast, not a single reader in order to compare the performances.  Well, that exercise is complete and I will forever listen to the single narrator audio book.

Having several voices at once without the visual help of a play, is confusing and at times annoying.  This selection includes music and background noise.  For example, as Emma and Harriet are walking from one place to another, there are birds chirping in the background and the constant sound of grass swooshing either from a breeze of from their walking through the fields.  I was so baffled by the additional sounds that I lost some of the dialogue, or could not hear it.  In addition, the producer decided that it would be a great idea to lower the volume at the end of every scene or chapter ultimately eliminating the last few sentences of the dialogue.

I know that Emma is a widely popular story so this is not to discourage anyone from reading or listening to it, just don’t listen to this version.

Genre/Subgenre:

Classic/Romance

Readalikes:

Vanity Fair by William Makepeace Thackeray

Surrender by Amanda Quick

Book Discussion Questions:

1. Describe the friendship between Emma and Harriet.  Would you say that Emma is a good friend?  Are her intentions altruistic or more selfish?

2. Mr. Knightly and Emma are described as intimate friends at the beginning of the story.  How does their relationship change as the story progresses?  What causes them to change?

3. Matchmaking is an important element in the story with some successes and some definitely not.  Which couples are good matches, which are bad and why do you think they either will or won’t last?

4. Is Emma a sympathetic character?  Does she have good intentions or is she ultimately thoughtless and unconcerned with the effects she has on people’s lives?

Reasons for selection:

I admit that I have never been a Jane Austin fan.  I don’t say that lightly because I am surrounded by fans and I try to keep that under wraps.  But I wanted to give the stories another whirl instead of just dismissing them as “classic” and “boring”.  (Yes, I am slightly uncultured that way, despite my parents best efforts.)  I picked up this Audio Book with the best of intentions, eager to hear the wonderful sounds of a British accent caught up in the ever-so-uninteresting lives of the 19th century England.  As you can see from my evaluation, my experience was less than pleasing.  However, knowing that the version was at fault, not the story, I plan on finding a better audio book and will joyously listen to that and hopefully appreciate Ms. Austin’s widely acclaimed talents.

The Art of Racing in the Rain

4W, 4H

Stein, Garth, (c. 2008). The Art of Racing in the Rain.  Harper Audio. 6 CD’s (7 hours) , $34.95.  Read by Christopher Evan Welch.

ISBN:  978-0-06-156540-3

Reviews
Powell’s Books, Book Reporter

Annotation:

Narrated by the family dog, Enzo looks back on his life with Denny, the aspiring race car driver and the lengths to which Enzo goes to protect their family.

Summary:  

Enzo has the soul of a human but is stuck with the paws of a dog.  He would much rather have the ever-so-useful opposable thumbs so that he could be more helpful to his family.  On the eve of his death, Enzo reflects back on the life that he has led with Denny; from the day Denny chose him from the large litter and brought him back to the apartment in Seattle to the the past few days leading up to this moment.  It has been an exciting life with Denny’s race car driving career, his beautiful wife and their wonderful child.  But when tragedy hits, Enzo knows that it is up to him to keep the family together and ultimately protect Denny from those that want to do him wrong.

Evaluation:

Stein skillfully brings to life each character with insights that only a dog could have.  It is a beautifully written story about family, devotion and the willpower needed to do the right thing.  And although the subject can be difficult and frustrating, Welch’s voice is perfect for personifying Enzo who is restricted by doing more because of his inability to speak and grab things.  Humorous, insightful, tragic and restorative, this book is a wonderful read/listen showing  the magical relationship between a man and his dog while life races along as ever-increasing speeds.

Genre/Subgenre:

Mainstream Fiction

Awards:

Booklist Editor’s Choice – Adult Fiction for Young Adults – 2008

Readalikes:

 Merle’s Door by Ted Kerasote

A Dog’s Purpose by W. Bruce Cameron

Book Discussion Questions:

What is “the art of racing in the rain”?

Using a dog as the narrator puts a unique spin on the story?  What would have been some of the major changes if the narrator had been a human?  And which human would have had the most unique perspective?

“No race has ever been won on the first corner; many races have been lost there.”  How does this observation carry through the story?

Did you learn more about race car driving from this book?  Do you agree with the parallels set forth between racing and living?

Do you look at your dog (or other dogs) differently after reading the book?

What exactly does the Zebra represent?

Reasons for selection:

At Sacramento Public Library, most librarians have “What I’m reading now” as part of their email signature.  This book came up on a message from one of the Branch Supervisors and as a dog lover, I was immediately intrigued.  She explained that they had just read it for their monthly Book Club and all members unanimously loved it.  With that, I picked it up.

The Last Runaway

  4W, 4H audio

Chevalier, Tracy, (c. 2013). The Last Runaway.  Penguin Audio. 8 discs (10 hours) , $32.99   Read by Kate Reading.

ISBN:  9781611761412

Reviews

The Guardian, Oprah.com

Annotation:

Immigrating to America in 1850, Honor moves into pre-Civil War Ohio where she must establish roots while not losing her sense of self.

Summary:  

Honor Bright travels with her sister from England to help her get settled with her new husband in Ohio.  It’s 1850 in America and Honor, a young, quiet Quaker woman, finds herself stranded in this foreign land when her sister dies on the journey.  Befriended by a milliner, Honor’s sewing skills help Belle with her business until Honor must leave to settle with a Quaker family in the neighboring town of Faithwell.  But Belle’s brother, Donovan, has taken an interest in Hope which does not bode well for Belle’s other business, that of helping free slaves through the underground railroad.  Donovan is a slave hunter and a good one at that.  His unwanted attention raises questions in Faithwell and puts Honor in a precarious position with her new family.

But Honor is true to her faith.  She understands the danger involved yet she becomes part of the underground railroad, helping slaves on their journey to freedom.  As she tries to fit in with her American family and avoid Donovan and his baffling appeal, Honor strives to do what is best until she is pushed too far and she can no longer distinguish between right and wrong.

Evaluation:

Beautifully written, Chevalier creates a story that captures an element of american history from the perspective of a reluctant immigrant who sees America and its challenges with fresh eyes.  The struggles of the “slave issue” in the free state of Ohio are just as intense as elsewhere with Honor’s character having to battle with the moral ambiguity of helping to free innocent people and protecting her own family.  A great work of historical fiction. brought to life with the reading  by Kate Reading whose different voices, inflections and accents created a vivid picture of life in America as seen through the eyes of Chevalier’s characters.

Genre/Subgenre:

Historical Fiction

Readalikes:

The Rebellion of Jane Clarke by Sally Gunning.  The Invention of Wings by Sue Monk Kidd

Book Discussion Questions:

Quilting is significant to the main character.  How does it enhance the story?

Which character(s) would you have liked to see more developed?

How is Honor “flawed”?  Are there aspects about her character that you find difficult to comprehend?

Reasons for selection:

This book was chosen for one of our class’s book discussion selections.  I listened to it thinking that I might not be able to get into it by reading the print version due to the pace of the story (an assumption).  I thoroughly enjoyed listening to it and found myself intrigued by the story and wondering how Chevalier was going to effectively bring all the pieces together.

Frozen In Time

   3W, 3H  (audio)

Zuckoff, Mitchell, (c. 2013). Frozen In Time.  Harper Collins Publisher. 8 discs (9 hours), $34.19.  Read by Mitchell Zuckoff.

ISBN  978-0-0622-8344-3

Reviews:

Washington Post, Christian Science Monitor

Annotation:

A true-life adventure about a WW II cargo plane that crashed into the Greenland ice cap and the rescue attempts that stranded the crewmen for 148 days.

Summary:  

In November of 1942, a cargo plane crashed into the Greenland ice cap trapping the survivors in Arctic Winter conditions surrounded by innumerable fissures overlaid with precarious ice bridges.  Many were killed on impact, one fell through an ice bridge never to be seen again and yet another watched as his feet turned black from frostbite. Zuckoff’s gripping tale, written from historical documents and interviews with those who were part of the efforts, captures the heroic efforts and frustrations surrounding this event that gripped the nation for a short period of time but then was forgotten.

Zuckhoff, a successful journalist with a previous published success, joins the 2012 expedition undertaken to recover the cargo plane and the remains of the crew that still lay under ice 70 years later.  His personal adventure is intertwined with the events of the original crash which generated two rescue attempts; the first attempt crashed with all nine crew members surviving and the second attempt simply vanished.

Evaluation:

Zuckhoff writes with a clean style, clearly describing both the harsh landscape and the important technical details involved in both the early rescue attempts and then the current day recovery mission.  The introduction explains how he found this story by searching through World War II era newspapers to find reports of incidents that captured the headlines but then faded away.  He successfully brings his words to life (he is also the reader for the audiobook) and it is apparent the passion he feels for those that survived and those that tragically died.  With so many heroic tales generated from the war, it is always a wonder that the drama behind such a situation has only recently been dug up and shared with the world.

Genre/Subgenre:

Non-Fiction/Historical

Awards:

School Library Journal’s Adult Books 4 Teens – 2013

Readalikes:

Vanished by Wil S. Hylton.  Miracle in the Andes by Nando Parrado.

Book Discussion Questions:

How did the intertwining of past and present work to make the story more (or less) appealing?

What do you think of the story?  Were there parts that slowed down the momentum?

Did Zuckoff effectively remove himself from the narrative even though he was a part of it?

Reasons for selection:

I need to expand my very limited knowledge of readable non-fiction and I thought this would be a good place to start.  Although it is highly rated and I do enjoy tales about World War II, I just could not get into the story.  That’s not to say that it won’t be a great read for those history and airplane buffs.  Personally, I need more character building and less technical description.

Purgatory Ridge

  3W, 3H  —  Audio Book

Krueger, William Kent. (p.2001). Purgatory Ridge.  Spokane, WA; Books in Motion. 12 audio discs (13 hr). $69.00.  Read by Jerry Sciarrio.

ISBN #: 1581167733

Reviews:

Publishers Weekly; Kirkus Review

Annotation:  

When Cork O’Connor’s family is kidnapped along with that of wealthy industrialist, Karl Lindstrom’s, Cork must figure out the real motive before more people die.

Summary:  

A bombing and subsequent murder of an Indian elder at the local lumber mill causes even more tension among the people of Aurora, Minnesota.   Due to an environmental uproar over the planned destruction of 300 year old trees sacred to the Anishinaabe/Ojibwe Tribe, Our Grandfathers, the town has been overrun by outside environmental groups, most notably “Echo Warrior” who has claimed responsibility for the bombing.  Karl Lindstrom, the lumber mill owner, has been at the center of the controversy and hires Cork to look into “Echo Warrior” on the side.  Since Cork is part Ojibwe and had been the Sheriff in Aurora a couple years back, Karl knew that Cork could be trusted to straddle the communities to get to the bottom of it.  When both Cork’s and Karl’s families are kidnapped, Cork must rely on his own intuition to determine who is behind the abductions and the true motivations of the criminal.

Evaluation:

Krueger does not disappoint with this third edition in his Cork O’Connor series.  The story starts off with a bang, literally, with the bombing and death of an elder tribe member.  The reader is effectively led into believing certain truths but then the author draws the reader back to take a different view of the surrounding events.   As with Krueger’s first two novels in the series, the wilderness comes alive in Purgatory Ridge as water, trees and weather play a part in the mayhem surrounding Cork’s quest to free his family.  And although the mystery is not so much of a who-done-it, readers will enjoy the twists and turns taken to culminate the tale.

Jerry Sciarrio’s reading is engaging and believable.  The characters are clearly defined and his straightforward delivery helps articulate the honor behind the words spoken by the Ojibwe tribe.

Genre/Subgenre:

Mystery

Readalikes:

Nine Dragons by Michael Connelly

Tularosa by Michael McGarrity

 Awards/Lists:

Minnesota Book Award: Genre Fiction

Dilys Award

Northeast Minnesota Book Award

Book Discussion Questions:

There are a lot of crimes in this story.  How did you feel about their resolution?  Did Krueger do a good job of wrapping things up?

What role did Echo Warrior play in this story?

Krueger’s criminals have different motivations.  Were they clearly delineated?

Reasons for selection:

This is the third book in Krueger’s Corcoran O’Connor mystery series.  The atmosphere of the Minnesota North-west is beautifully described letting the reader envelope themselves in the bleak, cold, crisp settings.  The O’Connor family is simultaneously warm and flawed which develops nicely through the series.  I am always drawn to modern mysteries in natural environments and Krueger’s stories are a bulls-eye.

The Good Lord Bird

GLB  4W, 4H  —  Audio Book

McBride, James. (p.2014, c.2013). The Good Lord Bird. Penguin Audio. 12 audio discs (14 hr., 36 min.). $59.99.  Read by Michael Boatman.

ISBN #: 9781624067105

Reviews:    New York Times Book Review    NPR article

Annotation:  

This fictional memoir tells the adventures of a slave boy, mistaken for a girl, who runs with Abolitionist John Brown, from Kansas to Harper’s Ferry.

Summary:  

Henry Shackleford narrates the tale of his days in 1857 Kansas Territory when he was kidnapped by the notorious Abolitionist John Brown, mistaken for a girl and unintentionally became John Brown’s good luck charm nicknamed Little Onion.  Realizing that he had better chances of survival maintaining his identity as a girl, Little Onion’s adventures with John Brown’s army spans 2 years, taking him from Kansas to Missouri to Canada and ultimately to Harper’s Ferry, Virginia in 1859.  And although the horror of slavery is apparent, McBride relates it through the eyes of an older Henry Shackleford who was caught up in the adventure while growing up midst all the chaos and uncertainty that plagued the country at that time.

Evaluation:

Michael Boatman skillfully brings to life the characters that James McBride created to tell the story of John Brown’s notorious army and bloody drive to eradicate freedom for the slaves.  Humor and a wide-eyed,  naive outlook, as only a 12 year old slave boy could have, bring this story to life and captures the brutality, turmoil and confusion in these pre-Civil War days.  Reminiscent of Mark Twain, McBride’s writing allows Boatman to use the diction and vocabulary of the 1850’s to effectively represent each character.  John Brown’s affinity for prayer and quoting the bible are well represented in this presentation leaving the listener with a clear picture of the Abolitionist and the mission on which he believed God had sent him.  Little Onion’s forays into saloon life, gathering up an army, avoiding romantic interludes and learning about life as a girl through a boy’s eyes keeps the reader engaged and eager for more.  A definite addition to any collection.

Genre/Subgenre:

Historical Fiction/Western

Readalikes:

Cloudsplitter by Russell Banks, Flash for Freedom by George MacDonald Fraser

Awards/Lists:

National Book Award for Fiction – 2013

New York Times Bestseller List

A Washington Post, Publishers Weekly, Oprah Magazine Top 10 Book of the Year

Book Discussion Questions:

What is your favorite “Onionism” when he/she describes John Brown?

How did you react to the language/colloquialism of the book?  Was it difficult to follow, believable, kept you entertained?

How does the Prologue set the tone for the book?

Why do you think James McBride chose this title for the story?

Reasons for selection:

This was part of Nancy Pearl’s 2013 “Books That Make Great Gifts” ALA presentation.  She described it as being a western, a genre I hadn’t picked up in a while.  I was intrigued with the idea of learning more about John Brown and I’m so glad that I chose it.