The Expats

Book Jacket  4W, 4H  Audio

Pavone, Chris., (c. 2012).  The Expats.  Read by Mozhan Marno.  Books on Tape. 10 discs (12 hrs, 24 mins), $32.95.

ISBN: 9780307990310

Reviews

NY Times, Kirkus Reviews

Annotation:

Ex CIA agent Kate Moore becomes the picture perfect ex-pat in Luxembourg until a new couple activates her well-honed instincts and she knows their survival is at risk.

Summary:  

Kate Moore is a typical expat mom with two kids supporting her husband in his new job in Luxembourg.  She left her job, her life in Washington D.C. knowing that it was a good move for her family, hoping that her past would finally be behind her.  But she can’t ignore her CIA training when questionable behavior starts coming to her notice.  Who is this couple that has suddenly popped into their lives and what exactly does her husband do and why has he become so evasive?  Soon Kate is traveling around the European continent hoping to find answers through her CIA contacts.  Is she over reacting or is she protecting her family?  This taught tale of intrigue will keep you on the edge of your seat, uncertain as to anyone’s intentions.

Evaluation:

Although the audio book was entertaining, this type of story in audio format can get confusing with all the characters coming in and out of the scenes along with the clandestine behavior that may be easier to follow in print.  Regardless, Pavone has created a wonderful heroine who is more chameleon than mom when it comes down to survival.  The plot is full of twists and turns reminding me of vintage Robert Ludlum.  Taking the reader on a tour of modern Europe, this is a great read for anyone who loves international intrigue along with a heroine who does not just sit by and let the world determine her place in it.  She is definitely a take-action kind of girl.

Author’s Website:

Chris Pavone

Genre/Subgenre:

Fiction/International espionage

Awards:

New York Times Bestseller

Edgar Award Winner

Anthony Award Winner

Readalikes:

The Girl Who Kicked the Hornets Nest by Steig Larsson.

The Lost Symbol by Dan Brown.

Book Discussion Questions:

1.  Kate’s character is constantly evolving.  Which role seems to fit her best or does she successfully incorporate them all?

2. Kate had led a double life and now is faced with the fact that her husband might be too. Is she setting a double standard or just responding to her well-honed skills?

3. Dexter sites human gullibility as a weakness yet he becomes ultimately gullible.  What makes him gullible?  Is he ultimately blameless?

4. What does this novel say about trust?  What does this novel say about marriage?

Reasons for selection:

I wanted to read something with international intrigue so I found this while on NoveList as a read-a-like for Steig Larsson’s “Dragon Series” and thought I would give it a try.  I’m glad I did.  Pavone definitely packs a punch and has the talent to intertwine multiple plots and characters for a very satisfying read.

The Last Policeman

Book Jacket  3W, 4H

Winters, Ben H., (c. 2012).  The Last Policeman.  Quirk Books. 288 pages , $23.95.

ISBN: 978-1-59474-576-8

Reviews:

Kirkus Reviews, Petoskey News

Annotation:

With only six months before the asteroid destroys the earth, Detective Hank Palace can’t ignore the superstitious death of local man whose hanging seems out of the ordinary.

Summary:  

In six months an asteroid, nicknamed Maia, is going to hit the earth destroying everything for hundreds of miles.  The problem is, no one knows exactly where its going to hit but they know its coming.  Newly promoted Detective Hank Palace understands why people around him have given up on their careers to fulfill their personal bucket list but its harder for him to deal with those that have given up permanently.  Concord, New Hampshire has been dubbed “Hanger town” because that seems to be the trend for dealing with the inevitable impact of Maia.  But when insurance man Peter Zell is found hung with an up-market belt in the stall of a McDonald’s bathroom, Hank suspects that something more is in play.  Surrounded by people that don’t understand why he even bothers, Hank doggedly pursues the leads in a town that is ready to die.

Evaluation:

This is a first novel of a trilogy that deals with a town that is preparing for destruction.  Although the pace is a little slow, the premise is enough to propel the reader through the intricacies of the crime.  Winters successfully illustrates the diversity of human reactions to this apocalyptic threat.  Some are permanently checking out, others are living life to the fullest, while even more are despondent and unsure of how to act.  And then there is Hank Palace, a man who takes his job seriously and won’t let a six-month sentence stop him from doing what he believes to be the right thing by his community.  Side stories including Palace’s ex-girlfriend, his sister and her radical husband may detract from the story a bit but it is a trilogy so their introduction may be necessary for the continuing story.  This is an easy book to recommend to those that enjoy a mystery but want something a little more to think about.

Author’s Website:

Ben H. Winters

Genre/Subgenre:

Science Fiction/Crime

Awards:

  • Edgar Allan Poe Awards: Best Paperback Original

Readalikes:

The Age of Miracles by Karen Thompson Walker.

The Road by Cormac McCarthy

Book Discussion Questions:

1. Describe Hank Palace’s character.  Why does he feel compelled to continue with his job while everyone else is “cashing in”?

2. Concord, N. H. has become a “hanger town”.  Why this method over any other?

3. If you had only 6 months until the world ended, realistically, what do you think you would do?

4.  How does Winters effectively develop the feel of this pre-apocolyptic world?

Reasons for selection:

Another on Nancy Pearl’s “Gift Book” list for 2013, this first in a pre-apocolyptic series intrigued me from the start.  Plus, the movie rights had just been bought so I knew it was going to be a popular series as the movies came out and working in a Public Library you need to stay on top of that stuff.

Blue Heaven

Book Jacket  4W, 4H

Box, C.J., (c. 2008).  Blue Heaven.  St. Martins Minotaur. 352 pages , $23.95.

ISBN: 9780312365707

Reviews

Kirkus Reviews, Publishers Weekly

Annotation:

When two children witness a murder in the Northern Idaho, they run for their lives.  But are they safe from the ex-cops they saw commit the crime?

Summary:  

An execution-style murder is witnessed by a twelve year old girl and her younger brother in the backwoods near their home in Northern Idaho.  As if that isn’t bad enough, the four men involved see them.  Running for their lives, the children soon realize that they can’t trust anyone except an old-rancher whose barn they seek out for refuge.

This part of Idaho has been dubbed “Blue Heaven” by the Los Angeles cops who have taken up retirement there.  And it’s the ex-cops that are in pursuit of the children.  But more is going on that brings attention to this part of the country.  Suspicious $100 bills are surfacing that were part of a robbery from a southern California race track years back.  Retired Detective, Villatoro is determined to solve this open case  and follow whatever leads he can find.  As all the pieces start coming together, the rancher Jess Rawlins and Detective Villatoro must face down these highly skilled and highly motivated ex-cops before they kill the children.

Evaluation:

Box skillfully brings together the plot lines and characters to produce his usual back-country brand of justice.  And even without his main series character, Joe Pickett, this stand-alone effectively puts the reader in the middle of beautiful country where human weaknesses have met their match. Box manages to introduce all the characters but gradually expose the threads tying everyone together making the climax not so much surprising but more validated.  In the spirit of the old-western, good versus evil is clearly laid out but with the twists and turns of modern day crime, weapons and greed.   Even if you are a Joe Pickett fan, Blue Heaven still provides all the reasons you love to read C.J. Box but with a whole set of new characters that will grab your heart and scream for justice, the old-west way.

Author’s Website:

C.J. Box

Genre/Subgenre:

Mystery/Crime

Awards:

  • Edgar Allan Poe Awards: Best Novel
  • The Reading List (RUSA): 2009

Readalikes:

Started Early, Took My Dog by Kate Atkinson.

The Narrows by Michael Connelly

Book Discussion Questions:

1. Describe Kootenai Bay and how does the nickname “Blue Heaven” fit?

2.  What traits does Annie display early on that makes her “a survivor”?

3.  Are Monica’s actions believable or is her character conveniently manipulated for the purpose of the plot?

4. Is Rawlins a throw-back to the Old-West hero?  What makes him the “unlikely hero”?

Reasons for selection:

I am an avid C.J. Box fan.  His Joe Pickett series always sends me back to my summers in Montana, without the murder and mayhem of course.  He was recommended to me by a library patron in 2009 and I haven’t stopped reading him.  I picked up Blue Heaven because it’s one of Box’s stand alone titles that still takes place in the rugged mountains of the north west.

Gone Girl

Book Jacket  4W, 4H

Flynn, Gillian, , (c. 2012). Gone Girl.  Crown. 416 pages , $25.99.

ISBN: 9780307588364

Reviews:

The NY Times, The Guardian

Annotation:

On their fifth anniversary, Nick returns home to find his wife missing.  Following the clues, he realizes the desperate game being played and that he’s the target.

Summary:  

On the Dunne’s fifth anniversary, wife Amy goes missing bringing on a firestorm of media, speculation and marital missteps.  Nick knows that he is innocent of foul play but everything clue points directly back to him and the role he has played in their “picture perfect” marriage.  Amy, whose parent’s entire career is based on their “Amazing Amy” books, leaves a diary behind that becomes more and more disturbing and layers are peeled away during the investigation.  Filled with plot twists, disturbing characters, and the most devious of all plots, Gone Girl will keep you guessing and simultaneously cringing as it exposes the side of humanity that is best left hidden.

Evaluation:

A brilliantly crafted thriller, this story is not for the light of heart.  Even if you are not a horror fan, you will be pulled into the twisted lives of this seemingly ordinary couple where power is everything and manipulation is the weapon of choice.  What makes this story so disturbing is that if deftly explores the institution of marriage making it an eerily plausible plot.  Flynn highlights the fact that we are at our best when we first meet, becoming people that we may not really be in order to impress our future mate.  Nick and Amy’s story takes that premise, adds some disturbing details and produces a set of circumstances that surprises and repulses simultaneously.

Reminiscent of the movie “War of the Roses”, it is hard to recommend a book where each character is more loathsome than the next.  This is definitely not a gory read, but a psychological journey into some very dark minds.  Although I did not enjoy the reading experience, I would suggest it to anyone who enjoys the genre, great writing and does not have a need to like the characters.

Author’s Website:

Gillian Flynn

Genre/Subgenre:

Thriller/Psychological

Readalikes:

Precious Things by Collette McBeth.

The Perfect Ghost by Linda Barnes

Awards/Lists:

  • Goodreads Choice Awards: 2012
  • Library Journal Best Books: 2012
  • Romantic Times Reviewers’ Choice Award – Best Mystery & Suspense: 2012
  • The Reading List (RUSA): 2013

Book Discussion Questions:

1. Do you like Nick or Amy?  Do you find yourself rooting for either one of them?

2. Why was Amy’s diary so effective both as a strategy for the author and as a manipulation used by the character?

3.  Amy described herself as “the cool girl” and her friend’s husbands as “dancing monkeys”.  How does this reflect back on Amy’s character and how she views the world.

4. Amy’s parents – there may not be enough time to discuss their overarching role, but give it a shot.  Why are they so important to the story?

5.  If you were to rewrite the ending, how would you do it?

Reasons for selection:

I first found this book on the Stop Your Killing Me Newsletter which I receive each month.  After reading it, I thought I had finally found the book that I would never pick up again.  I am admittedly a “sensitive” reader in that what I read definitely impacts my outlook.  I found this book depressing because the characters were so loathsome.

But then, it was chosen as a book discussion selection for this class.  I was encouraged to participate because I had such strong negative feelings about it.  So, I re-read the book and even though it still made me feel “icky”, I thoroughly enjoyed the conversation and took great pleasure in siting all the ways I detested Amy.  It proved to be a cleansing experience and now I will feel good about recommending it to those who enjoy the genre.

Eleven Days

Book Jacket   4W, 3H

Carpenter, Lee, (c. 2013). Eleven Days.  Alfred A. Knopf. 288 pages , $24.95.

ISBN:  9780307960702

Reviews:

The NY Times, Kirkus Review

Annotation:

Learning that her Navy Seal son has gone missing, Sara tries to obtain information through former contacts while reliving the choices they made leading up to this situation.

Summary:  

After losing her husband on an overseas mission, single-mother Sara is devastated when she hears that her only son has gone missing from his Navy Seals’ unit while involved in a covert mission.  The story takes place over the eleven days of waiting that Sara endures.  Her story and that of her son, Jason, unfolds in a sparse, clear text told through Sara’s memories and Jason’s letters home.  The letters show his rise into leadership and the decisions made allowing him to join such an elite military unit.  With great emotion and succinct prose, Carpenter successfully takes the reader through an intricate narrative that depicts yet another side-effect of war.

Evaluation:

Eleven Days is an intense debut novel that realistically shows the stress of having a son at war, not knowing what he is doing, where he is or if he is even still alive.  Told from both Sara’s and Jason’s perspectives, the story deals with far more than grief; it shows the development of a warrior, the ramifications of an absent parent and the overwhelming influence of a war-torn world.  In its sparse and intense prose, Carpenter pulls the reader further into the story by not only fully developing the key players but also having support characters that are rich and interesting and successfully play into the emotion.  This novel is not full of defiance or anti-war rhetoric but it does not need to be for the realism of the full impact of war to be clearly seen.

Genre/Subgenre:

Mainstream Fiction/Psychological

Readalikes:

The Last Samurai by Helen Dewitt.

The Antelope Wife by Louise Erdrich

Awards/Lists:

NPR Great Read of 2013

Book Discussion Questions:

1. A mother’s grief when her son goes to war is a common theme.  What makes this debut novel different?

2. “A myth is a fiction that matters.” (p. 241)  How do myth’s play into the story?

3. How are Sara and Jason affected by David’s absence?  Separately and together?

4. In the Kill House, Jason makes the decision to go back for the baby.  What are the literal and symbolic consequences of that decision?

Reasons for selection:

This is another selection from Nancy Pearl’s “Books That Make Great Gifts” list presented in December 2013.  I have yet to be disappointed with any selection.  Plus, I always like picking up a recommended debut novel in hopes that I will enjoy it and it will be the first of many.  I also chose it because I am a fan of stories about the elite military forces.  I am intrigued by the discipline needed to be part of one of these teams.  I was first introduced to the Navy Seals in Suzanne Brockman’s romance series about Team 16.  Eleven Days is not the same kind of read as Brockman but I was prepared for that and was captivated by the story.

Star Island

Book Jacket  4W, 3H

Hiaasen, Carl, (c. 2010). Star Island.  Alfred A. Knopf. 337 pages , $26.95.

ISBN: This key is a recommended rating system for books read in LIB 220 with Dr. Bodart.  The titles were changed to follow the theme of this blog.

Reviews:

L.A. Times, NY Times

Annotation:

Cherry Pye, the lip-synching, drug-addicted pop star, has a body double whose been kidnapped by a crazed paparazzo.  Can Cherry’s entourage save the double before anyone find outs she exists?

Summary:  

In Star Island, the main character, Ann DeLusia, is a double for a very messed up pop star, Cherry Pye.  Ann stands in for the pop star whenever Cherry is too wasted to show up in public or has to be whisked away to yet another detox center.  Add to this scenario an obsessed paparazzo, a crazed ex-governor with a soft spot for the mangrove swamps, unscrupulous music producers, a weed-whacking body guard and you have a vintage Hiaasen novel.

Ann, mistaken for Cherry, is kidnapped by the infatuated paparazzo, Bang Abbott.   She contacts Skink, the ex-governor, for help knowing that her welfare is not at the top the list for anyone riding the Cherry Pye money train,  namely Cherry’s parents, publicists and producer.  Filled with hi-jinks, capers, plots and thieving land-developers, Hiaasen doles out the justice as the characters race towards the final scene.

Evaluation:

When you pick up a Hiaasen you know that you are in for a wacky and wonderful ride.  In Star Island, he brings back two popular characters, Skink, the ex-governor of Florida (he was in office for about 5 minutes) and Chemo, the eight foot tall one-armed man who lost his arm to a barracuda.   To these intrepid individuals, he adds a list of characters that will keep you laughing and cringing throughout the escapades.  And although a straight up humorous tale, there is, unfortunately, more truth than fiction is his depiction of Cherry Pye’s stardom and the lengths to which people will go to make it shine.  This is another winner.

Genre/Subgenre:

Mystery/Humorous

Awards:

  • Booklist Editors’ Choice – Adult Fiction for Young Adults: 2010

Readalikes:

The Good Girl’s Guide to Murder by Susan McBride.

Turnpike Flameout by Eric Dezenhall

Book Discussion Questions:

1. There are two recurring characters in this book, Skink and Chemo.  What do they represent to Hiaasen and what is their appeal?

2. Hiaasen’s characters dole out all kinds of punishment for various reasons.  Which character receives the worst of it and why did Hiaasen set it up this way?

3.  Is there anything likable about Cherry Pye?

4. Based on Anne’s choices in the epilogue, how do we know that she still has her head on straight?

Reasons for selection:

After reading a Hiaasen selection for another class, I was eager to pick one of his adult books for this class.  I was not disappointed.  I enjoy satirical, quirky, straightforward characters and Hiaasen’s take on pop-culture was wonderfully validating.  I would recommend a Carl Hiaasen, Christoper Moore and Elmore Leonard all in the same breath.

Snapper

  4W, 3H

Kimberling, Brian, (c. 2013). Snapper.  Pantheon Books. 210 pages , $24.95.

ISBN:  978-0-307-90805-6

Reviews
NPR, The Boston Globe

Annotation:

Nathan stumbles in and out of his memories as he studies the songbirds of southern Indiana telling the tale of his journey from adolescence to adulthood.

Summary:  

Nathan Lochmuller discovers that he has a gift for tracking songbirds and spends his post-graduate years in southern Indiana as a research assistant doing just that.  The pay is poor but he loves the “office”.  Told in a series of short stories, Nathan exposes his unrequited love for the evasive, yet alluring Lola and shares experiences from his youth that have helped to shape him into the man he is learning to become.  A lyrical and absorbing tale, the past and present fit neatly together as Nathan introduces the characters that have become his world.

Evaluation:

This is the story of a young man’s coming of age, told from the perspective of an older man reminiscing about his days as a birdwatcher in the woods of southern Indiana.  The summary does not do justice to the pull of this novel that takes you from the misadventures of bored teenagers to the random letter writing at the truck stop outside the town of Santa Claus.  Kimberling’s debut novel is beautifully written with engaging characters.   This is one that definitely lingers after reading it knowing that it’s not about getting what you want but about wanting what you get.

Genre/Subgenre:

Mainstream Fiction

Awards:

Booklist Editor’s Choice – Best Fiction Books-2013

Readalikes:

An Invisible Sign of My Own by Aimee Bender.

Lightning by Jean Echenoz

Book Discussion Questions:

1.  Animals play an important part in this story, especially birds.  How do you think the animals help define the different characters and situations?  How does Kimberling use them to make the characters more three dimensional?

2.  “I got my job by accident” is the opening line for the novel.  How does this set the tone for the entire book and help initially define the main character, Nathan?

3.  Nathan’s relationships come and go over time.  How would you characterize them?  How do his relationships evolve as the story unfolds?

4.  Would you consider Snapper a series of short stories or a novel?  How do you define a story?  Can you write , as Ernest Hemingway did, a story in just six words?

5.  Why did he call the novel, “Snapper”?

Reasons for selection:

This book is part of Nancy Pearl’s 2013 “Books that make great gifts” list.  Admittedly I was far more intrigued by the cover than I was by the summary and picked it up from the shelf because I had recognized it.  Like many on this list, I’m glad I did.  I enjoyed Kimberling’s take on life in Indiana and his lyrical writing depicting the beauty of the country.